Ancient Greek Flatbread Propyra

Propyra (pronounced propýra) is an ancient Greek flatbread. Its name denotes a brick oven cooking technique: propyra was baked near to the oven’s door and far from the fire. Propyra’s ancient Greek recipe has stood the test of time; Greeks today call it Spetsiotic propyra, as the local islanders of the idyllic Greek island of Spetses continue to bake this flatbread everyday even to this day! Propyra is a wholemeal flatbread generously coated with sesame seeds, sea salt flakes, and freshly ground black pepper. Traditionally, propyra is eaten with almost every meal just like bread. Are you more of a flatbread than a baguette? No matter which type you may prefer, bread is one of our food staples.

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Ancient Greek Panspermia

Hermes Chthonius is a god associated with the earth and underworld. For Greeks, the gate to spring has been the Athenian festival of Anthesteria that was held for three days in the month of Anthesterion (February-March). Anthesteria is the ritual rite of the journey from winter to spring, from death to life. During the third day of the festival, the Greeks made panspermia. Panspermia is a multi-grain soup, which was offered to Hermes Chthonius and the dead. Packed with whole grains (whole grain helps lower cholesterol) this hearty dish is a nutrition powerhouse!

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Praline Carob Spread

This praline carob spread couldn’t be easier to make and will elevate your kids’ breakfast! This is a very healthy and nutritious praline spread — you can indulge yourself for a chocolatey craving without feeling guilty. Decidedly mature flavours — winey, honey, caramelly — make for a delightful nutty spread that is nutritious, vegetarian, and gluten-free. Praline carob spread served up in a cute jar steals the show at every gifting exchange; prepare to completely wow the recipient! And it tastes as good as it looks.

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Vasilopita

The Greek New Year’s Eve lucky cake is called Vasilopita. The cake contains a hidden gold or silver coin which is slipped into the dough before baking. The person who is fortunate enough to receive the slice containing the coin is believed to attract good luck throughout the year. The most enthralling element of the Greek custom of Vasilopita for the New Year is that this amaranthine recipe has endured for centuries in Greece. Family and friends join in the cutting of the Vasilopita in early January every year.

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Hecate’s Black Tart

As Halloween comes closer, let’s honour the chthonic goddess of the underworld, Hecate. Hecate is a dark goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Hecate’s Black Tart is perfect for a witch’s feast and a Halloween party! Hecate’s Black Tart with its rich and sweet pumpkin-chocolate filling and its soft-chewy molasses crust is vegan and sugar-free!

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Ancient Greek Pelanos Bread

Demeter was the goddess who taught humanity the art of making bread. After fasting, in commemoration of Demeter’s fasting while searching for her abducted by Pluto daughter, Persephone, the participants of the Lesser Eleusinian Mysteries ate pelanos, a wheat and barley bread. Succumb to the magnetism of the secret rites and feel the magic of turning water and flour into divine food.

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Vegan Valentines

Vegan Valentines are hibiscus biscuits and an indulgent Valentine’s Day treat.

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Pomegranate Liqueur

The Pomegranate Liqueur captures the fruity scent and flavor of pomegranate. It is perfect after dinner as a digestive or added in provocative cocktails! The aroma is unforgettable, while its crimson red color is bold and potent.

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